Translate this page!
Share with others :-)

Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention
according to mainstream science of medical epidemiology

Clinical Prevention Guidance

The prevention and control of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are based on the following five major strategies:
1) education and counseling of persons at risk on ways to avoid STDs through changes in sexual behaviors;
2) identification of asymptomatically infected persons and of symptomatic persons unlikely to seek diagnostic and treatment services;
3) effective diagnosis and treatment of infected persons;
4) evaluation, treatment, and counseling of sex partners of persons who are infected with an STD;
5) preexposure vaccination of persons at risk for vaccine-preventable STDs.

Primary prevention of STD begins with changing the sexual behaviors that place persons at risk for infection. [1]


HIV


Preventing HIV Transmission

Your risk of getting HIV or passing it to someone else depends on several things.  Do you know what they are? You might want to talk to someone who knows about HIV. You can also do the following:

Abstain from sex (do not have oral, anal, or vaginal sex) until you are in a relationship with only one person, are having sex with only each other, and each of you knows the other’s HIV status.  If you have, or plan to have, more than one sex partner, consider the following: Even if you think you have low risk for HIV infection, get tested whenever you have a regular medical check-up.
Do not inject illicit drugs (drugs not prescribed by your doctor). You can get HIV through needles, syringes, and other works if they are contaminated with the blood of someone who has HIV. Drugs also cloud your mind, which may result in riskier sex.
If you do inject drugs, do the following: Do not have sex when you are taking drugs or drinking alcohol because being high can make you more likely to take risks.

To protect yourself, remember these ABCs:

A=Abstinence

B=Be Faithful

C=Condoms

The ABCs of combination prevention

The ABCs of combination prevention includes various safer sex behaviour strategies that informed individuals who are in a position to decide for themselves can choose at different times in their lives to reduce their risk of exposing themselves or others to HIV These are often referred to as the ABCs of combination prevention.

A means abstinence—not engaging in sexual intercourse or delaying sexual initiation. Whether abstinence occurs by delaying sexual debut or by adopting a period of abstinence at a later stage, access to information and education about alternative safer sexual practices is critical to avoid HIV infection when sexual activity begins or is resumed.

B means being safer—by being faithful to one’s partner or reducing the number of sexual partners. The lifetime number of sexual partners is a very important predictor of HIV infection. Thus, having fewer sexual partners reduces the risk of HIV exposure. However, strategies to promote faithfulness among couples do not necessarily lead to lower incidence of HIV unless neither partner has HIV infection and both are consistently faithful.

C means correct and consistent condom use—condoms reduce the risk of HIV transmission for sexually active young people, couples in which one person is HIV-positive, sex workers and their clients, and anyone engaging in sexual activity with partners who may have been at risk of HIV exposure. Research has found that if people do not have access to condoms, other prevention strategies lose much of their potential effectiveness.

A, B, and C interventions can be adapted and combined in a balanced approach that will vary by cultural context, the population addressed and the stage of the epidemic. [2]



Spread love, not germs: CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Spread love, not germs:

(a) Abstain from sex.
(c) If you choose to have sex, use latex condoms
which can lower the risk for STIs and unintended pregnancy.
(b) Having a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner
may help lower your risk. [3]




Questions and Answers

Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Centros para el Control y la Prevención
de Enfermedades
CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA



How is HIV passed from one person to another?

Which body fluids transmit HIV?
How well does HIV survive outside the body?
Can I get HIV from kissing?
Can I get HIV from oral sex?
Can I get HIV from anal sex?
Can I get HIV from vaginal sex?
Is there a connection between HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases?
Why is injecting drugs a risk for HIV?
Are health care workers at risk of getting HIV on the job?
Are patients in a health care setting at risk of getting HIV?
Are lesbians or other women who have sex with women at risk for HIV?
Can I get HIV from getting a tattoo or through body piercing?
Can I get HIV from a bite?
Can I get HIV from casual contact (shaking hands, hugging, using a toilet, drinking from the same glass, or the sneezing and coughing of an infected person)?
Can I get HIV from mosquitoes?
Can I get HIV while playing sports?

How is HIV passed from one person to another?

HIV transmission can occur when blood, semen (cum), pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum), vaginal fluid, or breast milk from an infected person enters the body of an uninfected person.

HIV can enter the body through a vein (e.g., injection drug use), the lining of the anus or rectum, the lining of the vagina and/or cervix, the opening to the penis, the mouth, other mucous membranes (e.g., eyes or inside of the nose), or cuts and sores. Intact, healthy skin is an excellent barrier against HIV and other viruses and bacteria.

These are the most common ways that HIV is transmitted from one person to another:

  • by having sex (anal, vaginal, or oral) with an HIV-infected person;
  • by sharing needles or injection equipment with an injection drug user who is infected with HIV; or
  • from HIV-infected women to their babies before or during birth, or through breast-feeding after birth.

HIV also can be transmitted through receipt of infected blood or blood clotting factors. However, since 1985, all donated blood in the United States has been tested for HIV. Therefore, the risk of infection through transfusion of blood or blood products is extremely low. The U.S. blood supply is considered to be among the safest in the world.

(...)

Some health-care workers have become infected after being stuck with needles containing HIV-infected blood or, less frequently when infected blood comes in contact with a worker's open cut or is splashed into a worker's eyes or inside their nose. There has been only one instance of patients being infected by an HIV-infected dentist to his patients.

For more information, see "Are health care workers at risk of getting HIV on the job?" and "Are patients in a health care setting at risk of getting HIV?"

(...)

Which body fluids transmit HIV?

These body fluids have been shown to contain high concentrations of HIV:
  • blood
  • semen
  • vaginal fluid
  • breast milk
  • other body fluids containing blood
The following are additional body fluids that may transmit the virus that health care workers may come into contact with:
  • fluid surrounding the brain and the spinal cord
  • fluid surrounding bone joints
  • fluid surrounding an unborn baby
HIV has been found in the saliva and tears of some persons living with HIV, but in very low quantities. It is important to understand that finding a small amount of HIV in a body fluid does not necessarily mean that HIV can be transmitted by that body fluid. HIV has not been recovered from the sweat of HIV-infected persons. Contact with saliva, tears, or sweat has never been shown to result in transmission of HIV.

How well does HIV survive outside the body?

Scientists and medical authorities agree that HIV does not survive well outside the body, making the possibility of environmental transmission remote. HIV is found in varying concentrations or amounts in blood, semen, vaginal fluid, breast milk, saliva, and tears. To obtain data on the survival of HIV, laboratory studies have required the use of artificially high concentrations of laboratory-grown virus. Although these unnatural concentrations of HIV can be kept alive for days or even weeks under precisely controlled and limited laboratory conditions, CDC studies have shown that drying of even these high concentrations of HIV reduces the amount of infectious virus by 90 to 99 percent within several hours. Since the HIV concentrations used in laboratory studies are much higher than those actually found in blood or other specimens, drying of HIV-infected human blood or other body fluids reduces the theoretical risk of environmental transmission to that which has been observed - essentially zero. Incorrect interpretations of conclusions drawn from laboratory studies have in some instances caused unnecessary alarm.

Results from laboratory studies should not be used to assess specific personal risk of infection because (1) the amount of virus studied is not found in human specimens or elsewhere in nature, and (2) no one has been identified as infected with HIV due to contact with an environmental surface. Additionally, HIV is unable to reproduce outside its living host (unlike many bacteria or fungi, which may do so under suitable conditions), except under laboratory conditions; therefore, it does not spread or maintain infectiousness outside its host.

Can I get HIV from kissing?

On the Cheek:

HIV is not transmitted casually, so kissing on the cheek is very safe. Even if the other person has the virus, your unbroken skin is a good barrier. No one has become infected from such ordinary social contact as dry kisses, hugs, and handshakes.

Open-Mouth Kissing:

Open-mouth kissing is considered a very low-risk activity for the transmission of HIV. However, prolonged open-mouth kissing could damage the mouth or lips and allow HIV to pass from an infected person to a partner and then enter the body through cuts or sores in the mouth. Because of this possible risk, the CDC recommends against open-mouth kissing with an infected partner.

One case suggests that a woman became infected with HIV from her sex partner through exposure to contaminated blood during open-mouth kissing.

For more information refer to the July 11, 1997, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Transmission of HIV Possibly Associated with Exposure of Mucous Membrane to Contaminated Blood.

Can I get HIV from oral sex?

Yes, it is possible for either partner to become infected with HIV through performing or receiving oral sex. There have been a few cases of HIV transmission from performing oral sex on a person infected with HIV. While no one knows exactly what the degree of risk is, evidence suggests that the risk is less than that of unprotected anal or vaginal sex.

If the person performing oral sex has HIV, blood from their mouth may enter the body of the person receiving oral sex through

  • the lining of the urethra (the opening at the tip of the penis);
  • the lining of the vagina or cervix;
  • the lining of the anus; or
  • directly into the body through small cuts or open sores.

If the person receiving oral sex has HIV, their blood, semen (cum), pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum), or vaginal fluid may contain the virus. Cells lining the mouth of the person performing oral sex may allow HIV to enter their body.

The risk of HIV transmission increases

  • if the person performing oral sex has cuts or sores around or in their mouth or throat;
  • if the person receiving oral sex ejaculates in the mouth of the person performing oral sex; or
  • if the person receiving oral sex has another sexually transmitted disease (STD).

Not having (abstaining from) sex is the most effective way to avoid HIV.

If you choose to perform oral sex, and your partner is male,

  • use a latex condom on the penis; or
  • if you or your partner is allergic to latex, plastic (polyurethane) condoms can be used.

Studies have shown that latex condoms are very effective, though not perfect, in preventing HIV transmission when used correctly and consistently. If either partner is allergic to latex, plastic (polyurethane) condoms for either the male or female can be used. For more information about latex condoms, see "Male Latex Condoms and Sexually Transmitted Diseases."

If you choose to have oral sex, and your partner is female,

  • use a latex barrier (such as a natural rubber latex sheet, a dental dam or a cut-open condom that makes a square) between your mouth and the vagina. A latex barrier such as a dental dam reduces the risk of blood or vaginal fluids entering your mouth. Plastic food wrap also can be used as a barrier.

If you choose to perform oral sex with either a male or female partner and this sex includes oral contact with your partners anus (analingus or rimming),

  • use a latex barrier (such as a natural rubber latex sheet, a dental dam or a cut-open condom that makes a square) between your mouth and the anus. Plastic food wrap also can be used as a barrier.

If you choose to share sex toys with your partner, such as dildos or vibrators,

  • each partner should use a new condom on the sex toy; and
  • be sure to clean sex toys between each use.
Can I get HIV from anal sex?

Yes. In fact, unprotected (without a condom) anal sex (intercourse) is considered to be very risky behavior. It is possible for either sex partner to become infected with HIV during anal sex. HIV can be found in the blood, semen, pre-seminal fluid, or vaginal fluid of a person infected with the virus. In general, the person receiving the semen is at greater risk of getting HIV because the lining of the rectum is thin and may allow the virus to enter the body during anal sex. However, a person who inserts his penis into an infected partner also is at risk because HIV can enter through the urethra (the opening at the tip of the penis) or through small cuts, abrasions, or open sores on the penis.

Not having (abstaining from) sex is the most effective way to avoid HIV. If people choose to have anal sex, they should use a latex condom. Most of the time, condoms work well. However, condoms are more likely to break during anal sex than during vaginal sex. Thus, even with a condom, anal sex can be risky. A person should use generous amounts of water-based lubricant in addition to the condom to reduce the chances of the condom breaking.

For more information on latex condoms, see "Male Latex Condoms and Sexually Transmitted Diseases."

Can I get HIV from vaginal sex?

Yes, it is possible for either partner to become infected with HIV through vaginal sex* (intercourse). In fact, it is the most common way the virus is transmitted in much of the world. HIV can be found in the blood, semen (cum), pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum) or vaginal fluid of a person infected with the virus.

In women, the lining of the vagina can sometimes tear and possibly allow HIV to enter the body. HIV can also be directly absorbed through the mucous membranes that line the vagina and cervix.

In men, HIV can enter the body through the urethra (the opening at the tip of the penis) or through small cuts or open sores on the penis.

Risk for HIV infection increases if you or a partner has a sexually transmitted disease (STD). See also "Is there a connection between HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases?"

Not having (abstaining from) sex is the most effective way to avoid HIV. If you choose to have vaginal sex, use a latex condom to help protect both you and your partner from HIV and other STDs. Studies have shown that latex condoms are very effective, though not perfect, in preventing HIV transmission when used correctly and consistently. If either partner is allergic to latex, plastic (polyurethane) condoms for either the male or female can be used.

For more information on latex condoms, see "Male Latex Condoms and Sexually Transmitted Diseases."

(...)

* For the purpose of this FAQ, vaginal sex or intercourse refers to sexual activity between a man and a woman involving the insertion of the penis into the vagina.


Is there a connection between HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases?

Yes. Having a sexually transmitted disease (STD) can increase a person's risk of becoming infected with HIV, whether the STD causes open sores or breaks in the skin (e.g., syphilis, herpes, chancroid) or does not cause breaks in the skin (e.g., chlamydia, gonorrhea).

If the STD infection causes irritation of the skin, breaks or sores may make it easier for HIV to enter the body during sexual contact. Even when the STD causes no breaks or open sores, the infection can stimulate an immune response in the genital area that can make HIV transmission more likely.

In addition, if an HIV-infected person is also infected with another STD, that person is three to five times more likely than other HIV-infected persons to transmit HIV through sexual contact.

Not having (abstaining from) sexual intercourse is the most effective way to avoid all STDs, including HIV. For those who choose to be sexually active, the following HIV prevention activities are highly effective:

  • Engaging in behaviors that do not involve vaginal or anal intercourse or oral sex
  • Having sex with only one uninfected partner
  • Using latex condoms every time you have sex

For more information on latex condoms, see "Male Latex Condoms and Sexually Transmitted Diseases."

For more information about the connection between HIV and other STDs, see "The Role of STD Testing and Treatment in HIV Prevention."


Why is injecting drugs a risk for HIV?

At the start of every intravenous injection, blood is introduced into the needle and syringe. HIV can be found in the blood of a person infected with the virus. The reuse of a blood-contaminated needle or syringe by another drug injector (sometimes called "direct syringe sharing") carries a high risk of HIV transmission because infected blood can be injected directly into the bloodstream.

Sharing drug equipment (or "works") can be a risk for spreading HIV. Infected blood can be introduced into drug solutions by

  • using blood-contaminated syringes to prepare drugs;
  • reusing water;
  • reusing bottle caps, spoons, or other containers ("spoons" and "cookers") used to dissolve drugs in water and to heat drug solutions; or
  • reusing small pieces of cotton or cigarette filters ("cottons") used to filter out particles that could block the needle.

"Street sellers" of syringes may repackage used syringes and sell them as sterile syringes. For this reason, people who continue to inject drugs should obtain syringes from reliable sources of sterile syringes, such as pharmacies.

It is important to know that sharing a needle or syringe for any use, including skin popping and injecting steroids, can put one at risk for HIV and other blood-borne infections.

For more information see “How can injection drug users reduce their risk for HIV infection?

Are health care workers at risk of getting HIV on the job?

The risk of health care workers being exposed to HIV on the job is very low, especially if they carefully follow universal precautions (i.e., using protective practices and personal protective equipment to prevent HIV and other blood-borne infections). It is important to remember that casual, everyday contact with an HIV-infected person does not expose health care workers or anyone else to HIV. For health care workers on the job, the main risk of HIV transmission is through accidental injuries from needles and other sharp instruments that may be contaminated with the virus; however even this risk is small. Scientists estimate that the risk of infection from a needle-stick is less than 1 percent, a figure based on the findings of several studies of health care workers who received punctures from HIV-contaminated needles or were otherwise exposed to HIV-contaminated blood.

For more information on preventing occupational exposure to HIV, refer to the CDC fact sheet, “Preventing Occupational HIV Transmission to Healthcare Personnel.”

Although the most important strategy for reducing the risk of occupational HIV transmission is to prevent occupational exposures, plans for postexposure management of health care personnel should be in place. For guidelines on management of occupational exposure, refer to the June 29, 2001 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, “Updated U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Occupational Exposures to HBV, HCV, and HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis.”

Are patients in a health care setting at risk of getting HIV?

Although HIV transmission is possible in health care settings, it is extremely rare. Medical experts emphasize that the careful practice of infection control procedures, including universal precautions (i.e., using protective practices and personal protective equipment to prevent HIV and other blood-borne infections), protects patients as well as health care providers from possible HIV transmission in medical and dental offices and hospitals.

For more information on preventing occupational exposure to HIV, refer to the CDC fact sheet, “Preventing Occupational HIV Transmission to Healthcare Personnel.”

In 1990, the CDC reported on an HIV-infected dentist in Florida who apparently infected some of his patients while doing dental work. Studies of viral DNA sequences linked the dentist to six of his patients who were also HIV-infected. The CDC has not yet been able to establish how the transmission took place. No additional studies have found any evidence of transmission from provider to patient in health care settings.

CDC has documented rare cases of patients contracting HIV in health care settings from infected donor tissue. Most of these cases occurred due to failures in following universal precautions and infection control guidelines. Most also occurred early in the HIV epidemic, before established screening procedures were in place.

For more information, see "Are health care workers at risk of getting HIV on the job?" or visit the health care worker section of the CDC National Prevention Information Network (NPIN) Web site

Are lesbians or other women who have sex with women at risk for HIV?

Female-to-female transmission of HIV appears to be a rare occurrence. However, there are case reports of female-to-female transmission of HIV. The well documented risk of female-to-male transmission of HIV shows that vaginal secretions and menstrual blood may contain the virus and that mucous membrane (e.g., oral, vaginal) exposure to these secretions has the potential to lead to HIV infection.

In order to reduce the risk of HIV transmission, women who have sex with women should do the following:

  • Avoid exposure of a mucous membrane, such as the mouth, (especially non-intact tissue) to vaginal secretions and menstrual blood.
  • Use condoms consistently and correctly each and every time for sexual contact with men or when using sex toys. Sex toys should not be shared. No barrier methods for use during oral sex have been evaluated as effective by the FDA. However, natural rubber latex sheets, dental dams, cut open condoms, or plastic wrap may offer some protection from contact with body fluids during oral sex and possibly reduce the risk of HIV transmission.
  • Know your own and your partner’s HIV status. This knowledge can help uninfected women begin and maintain behavioral changes that reduce the risk of becoming infected. For women who are found to be infected, it can assist in getting early treatment and avoiding infecting others.

For more information refer to “HIV/AIDS among Women Who Have Sex with Women”.

Can I get HIV from getting a tattoo or through body piercing?

A risk of HIV transmission does exist if instruments contaminated with blood are either not sterilized or disinfected or are used inappropriately between clients. CDC recommends that single-use instruments intended to penetrate the skin be used once, then disposed of.  Reusable instruments or devices that penetrate the skin and/or contact a client's blood should be thoroughly cleaned and sterilized between clients

View the CDC fact sheet on the sterilization of patient-care equipment and HIV (from the CDC Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion Web site).

Personal service workers who do tattooing or body piercing should be educated about how HIV is transmitted and take precautions to prevent transmission of HIV and other blood-borne infections in their settings.

If you are considering getting a tattoo or having your body pierced, ask staff at the establishment what procedures they use to prevent the spread of HIV and other blood-borne infections, such as the hepatitis B virus. You also may call the local health department to find out what sterilization procedures are in place in the local area for these types of establishments.

Can I get HIV from a bite?

Human Bite:

In 1997, CDC published findings from a state health department investigation of an incident that suggested blood-to-blood transmission of HIV by a human bite. There have been other rare reports in the medical literature in which HIV appeared to have been transmitted by a bite. Severe trauma with extensive tissue tearing and damage and presence of blood were reported in each of these instances. Biting is not a common way of transmitting HIV. In fact, there are numerous reports of bites that did not result in HIV infection.

Non-Human Bite:

HIV is a virus that infects humans and thus cannot be transmitted to or carried by non-human animals. The only exception to this is a few chimpanzees in laboratories that have been artificially infected with HIV. Because HIV is not found in non-human animals it is not possible for HIV to be transmitted from an animal bite, such as from a dog or cat.

Some animals can carry viruses that are similar to HIV, such as FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) found in cats or SIV (Simian Immunodeficiency Virus) found in apes. These viruses can only exist in their specific animal host and are not transmissible to humans.

Can I get HIV from casual contact (shaking hands, hugging, using a toilet, drinking from the same glass, or the sneezing and coughing of an infected person)?

No. HIV is not transmitted by day-to-day contact in the workplace, schools, or social settings. HIV is not transmitted through shaking hands, hugging, or a casual kiss. You cannot become infected from a toilet seat, a drinking fountain, a door knob, dishes, drinking glasses, food, or pets.

HIV is not an airborne or food-borne virus, and it does not live long outside the body. HIV can be found in the blood, semen, or vaginal fluid of an infected person. The three main ways HIV is transmitted are

  • through having sex (anal, vaginal, or oral) with someone infected with HIV.
  • through sharing needles and syringes with someone who has HIV.
  • through exposure (in the case of infants) to HIV before or during birth, or through breast feeding.

For more information about HIV transmission, see "HIV and Its Transmission."

Although contact with blood and other body substances can occur in households, transmission of HIV is rare in this setting. A small number of transmission cases have been reported in which a person became infected with HIV as a result of contact with blood or other body secretions from an HIV-infected person in the household. For information on these cases refer to the May 20, 1994 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, “Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission in Household Settings — United States.”

Persons living with HIV and persons providing home care for those living with HIV should be fully educated and trained regarding appropriate infection-control procedures.

You may view and/or download "Caring for Someone with AIDS at Home."

For more information on about providing home care or living with a person who is HIV-infected, visit the CDC National Prevention Information Network (NPIN) Web site,Link Leaves the DHAP Internet Site

Can I get HIV from mosquitoes?

No. From the start of the HIV epidemic there has been concern about HIV transmission from biting and bloodsucking insects, such as mosquitoes. However, studies conducted by the CDC and elsewhere have shown no evidence of HIV transmission from mosquitoes or any other insects - even in areas where there are many cases of AIDS and large populations of mosquitoes. Lack of such outbreaks, despite intense efforts to detect them, supports the conclusion that HIV is not transmitted by insects.

The results of experiments and observations of insect biting behavior indicate that when an insect bites a person, it does not inject its own or a previously bitten person's or animal's blood into the next person bitten. Rather, it injects saliva, which acts as a lubricant so the insect can feed efficiently. Diseases such as yellow fever and malaria are transmitted through the saliva of specific species of mosquitoes. However, HIV lives for only a short time inside an insect and, unlike organisms that are transmitted via insect bites, HIV does not reproduce (and does not survive) in insects. Thus, even if the virus enters a mosquito or another insect, the insect does not become infected and cannot transmit HIV to the next human it bites.

There also is no reason to fear that a mosquito or other insect could transmit HIV from one person to another through HIV-infected blood left on its mouth parts. Several reasons help explain why this is so. First, infected people do not have constantly high levels of HIV in their blood streams. Second, insect mouth parts retain only very small amounts of blood on their surfaces. Finally, scientists who study insects have determined that biting insects normally do not travel from one person to the next immediately after ingesting blood. Rather, they fly to a resting place to digest the blood meal.

Can I get HIV while playing sports?

There are no documented cases of HIV being transmitted during participation in sports. The very low risk of transmission during sports participation would involve sports with direct body contact in which bleeding might be expected to occur.

If someone is bleeding, their participation in the sport should be interrupted until the wound stops bleeding and is both antiseptically cleaned and securely bandaged. There is no risk of HIV transmission through sports activities where bleeding does not occur.




¿Cómo se pasa el VIH de una persona a otra?

¿Cuáles son los líquidos corporales que transmiten el VIH?
¿El VIH sobrevive fuera del cuerpo?
¿Puedo contraer el VIH mediante un beso?
¿Puedo contraer el VIH por tener relaciones sexuales orales?
¿Puedo contraer el VIH teniendo relaciones sexuales anales?
¿Puedo contraer el VIH teniendo relaciones sexuales vaginales?
¿Hay una conexión entre el VIH y otras enfermedades de transmisión sexual?
¿Por qué son las drogas inyectables un riesgo para el VIH?
¿Los profesionales de la salud corren riesgo de adquirir el HIV en el lugar de trabajo?
¿Los pacientes corren riesgo de contraer el VIH en los centros de salud?
¿Las “lesbianas” u otras mujeres que tienen relaciones sexuales con otras mujeres corren riesgo de contraer el VIH?
¿Puedo contraer el VIH por ponerme un tatuaje o por hacerme agujeros en el cuerpo?
¿Puedo contraer el VIH mediante una mordida?
¿Puedo contraer el VIH por contacto casual (tocando manos, abrazando, usando un inodoro, bebiendo del mismo vaso, o por el estornudo y tos de una persona infectada)?
¿Puedo infectarme con el VIH por la picadura de un mosquito u otro insecto?
¿Debo preocuparme de contraer el VIH por jugar deportes?


¿Cómo se pasa el VIH de una persona a otra?

La transmisión por el VIH puede ocurrir cuando la sangre, el semen (incluyendo el líquido preseminal, o "pre-cum"), el líquido vaginal, o la leche materna de una persona infectada se introduce en el cuerpo de una persona no infectada.

El VIH puede introducirse en el cuerpo a través de una vena (por ejemplo, uso de drogas inyectables), el ano o recto, la vagina, el pene, la boca, otras mucosas (por ejemplo, los ojos o dentro de la nariz) o cortadas y heridas. La piel intacta, sana, es una barrera excelente contra el VIH, otros virus y las bacterias.

Estas son las maneras más comunes de que el VIH se transmite de una persona a otra:

  • al tener relaciones sexuales (anales, vaginales, u orales) con una persona infectada por el VIH
  • al compartir las agujas o equipo de inyección con un usuario de drogas inyectables que está infectado por el VIH
  • de las mujeres infectadas por VIH a los bebés antes de o durante el nacimiento, o a través de la lactancia materna después del nacimiento

El VIH también puede transmitirse a través de las transfusiones de sangre. Sin embargo, desde 1985, toda la sangre donada en los Estados Unidos se examina por el VIH. Por consecuencia, el riesgo de la infección a través de la transfusión de la sangre o los hemoderivados es sumamente bajo. El suministro de sangre en los Estados Unidos. se considera uno de los más seguros en el mundo.

(...)

Algunos trabajadores de la salud han contraído la infección después de pincharse con agujas que contienen sangre infectada o, con menos frecuencia, después de contacto con sangre infectada en una cortada abierta o a través de salpicaduras en los ojos o nariz del trabajador.. Ha habido solo un caso donde pacientes se han infectado al recibir cuidado por un trabajador de salud. Esto ocurrió cuando un dentista seropositivo infectó a seis pacientes.

(Para más información vea, "¿Están en riesgo de contraer el VIH en el trabajo la gente que trabaja en los entornos de salud?" y "¿Están en riesgo de contraer el VIH los pacientes en una oficina de doctor o dentista?")

¿Cuáles son los líquidos corporales que transmiten el VIH?

Se ha demostrado que los siguientes líquidos corporales contienen altas concentraciones de VIH:

  • sangre
  • semen
  • secreciones vaginales
  • leche materna
  • otros líquidos corporales que contienen sangre

A continuación se mencionan otros líquidos corporales que pueden transmitir el virus, y con los cuales pueden tener contacto los trabajadores de la salud:

  • el líquido que rodea el cerebro y la médula espinal
  • el líquido que rodea las articulaciones
  • el líquido que rodea al bebé por nacer

Se ha encontrado el VIH en la saliva y en las lágrimas de algunas personas que tienen el VIH, pero en muy pequeñas cantidades. Es  importante tener en claro que el hecho de hallar una pequeña cantidad de VIH en un líquido corporal no significa necesariamente que el VIH pueda ser transmitido por dicho líquido. No se ha detectado el VIH en el sudor de las personas infectadas. Nunca se ha demostrado que la saliva, las lágrimas o el sudor puedan causar la transmisión del VIH.

¿El VIH sobrevive fuera del cuerpo?

Las autoridades médicas y científicas están de acuerdo en que el VIH no sobrevive con facilidad fuera del cuerpo, lo cual hace remota la posibilidad de una transmisión ambiental. El VIH se encuentra a diferentes cantidades o concentraciones en la sangre, el semen, las secreciones vaginales, la leche de seno, la saliva y las lágrimas. Para obtener datos acerca de la supervivencia del VIH, los estudios de laboratorio han tenido que utilizar concentraciones artificialmente elevadas de virus cultivados en laboratorio. Aunque estas concentraciones no naturales del VIH se pueden mantener con vida durante días o incluso semanas en condiciones de laboratorio limitadas y de control estricto, los estudios de los CDC han demostrado que incluso a esas altas concentraciones, las concentraciones de VIH se secan después de varias horas y la cantidad del virus infeccioso se reduce entre un 90 y un 99 por ciento. Debido a que las concentraciones del VIH usadas en los estudios de laboratorio son mucho más altas que las encontradas en circunstancias reales en la sangre y en otros especímenes, el secado de la sangre humana y de otros líquidos corporales infectados por el VIH, reduce el riesgo teórico de transmisión ambiental esencialmente a cero. En ciertas ocasiones, las interpretaciones incorrectas de algunas conclusiones derivadas de estudios de laboratorio han causado alarmas innecesarias.

No se deben utilizar los resultados de los estudios de laboratorio para evaluar el riesgo personal específico de infección porque (1) la cantidad estudiada del virus no se halla en muestras humanas ni en la naturaleza y (2) no se ha identificado ningún caso de infección por el VIH debido al contacto con una superficie ambiental. Además, el VIH no se puede reproducir fuera de su huésped vivo (a diferencia de muchas bacterias u hongos que pueden hacerlo en condiciones adecuadas), a menos que el VIH esté en condiciones de laboratorio; por lo consiguiente, no se propaga ni mantiene su contagiosidad fuera de su huésped.

¿Puedo contraer el VIH mediante un beso?

En la mejilla:

El VIH no se transmite en forma casual, así que besar a alguien en la mejilla es muy seguro. Aunque la otra persona tenga el virus, una piel sana e intacta constituye una buena barrera contra el mismo. Nadie ha contraído la infección por tener un contacto social normal como besos secos, abrazos y apretones de manos.

Besos de boca abierta:

Los besos de boca abierta se consideran una actividad de muy bajo riesgo en la transmisión del VIH. Sin embargo, los besos prolongados de boca abierta podrían lesionar la boca o los labios y permitir que el VIH pase de una persona infectada a su pareja y entrar al cuerpo a través de cortaduras o heridas en la boca. Debido a este posible riesgo, los CDC no recomiendan los besos de boca abierta con una persona infectada.

Existe un caso que parece indicar que una mujer se infectó con el VIH de su pareja sexual a través de la exposición a sangre contaminada durante un beso de boca abierta.

Para obtener más información, consulte el documento en inglés “Transmission of HIV Possibly Associated with Exposure of Mucous Membrane to Contaminated Blood” publicado en el Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report del 11 de julio de 1997.

¿Puedo contraer el VIH por tener relaciones sexuales orales?

Sí, es posible que cualquiera en la pareja contraiga el VIH por realizar o recibir relaciones sexuales orales. Ha habido unos cuantos casos en los cuales se ha transmitido el VIH por realizar relaciones sexuales orales en una persona infectada por el VIH. Aunque nadie sabe con exactitud cuál es el grado de riesgo de esta actividad, la evidencia parece indicar que el riesgo es menor del que se sufre por tener relaciones sexuales anales o vaginales sin protección.

Si la persona que realiza relaciones sexuales orales tiene el VIH, la sangre de su boca puede entrar en el cuerpo de la persona que está recibiendo relaciones sexuales orales a través de:

  • el revestimiento de la uretra (la abertura en la punta del pene);
  • el revestimiento de la vagina o del cuello uterino;
  • el revestimiento del ano; o
  • cortaduras pequeñas o heridas abiertas que permiten la entrada directa al cuerpo.

Si la persona que recibe relaciones sexuales orales tiene el VIH, su sangre, semen, líquido preseminal o secreciones vaginales pueden contener el virus. Las células que recubren la boca de la persona que realiza relaciones sexuales orales pueden permitir que el VIH entre a su cuerpo.

El riesgo de transmisión del VIH aumenta si:

  • la persona que realiza relaciones sexuales orales tiene cortaduras o heridas alrededor o dentro de la boca o garganta;
  • si la persona que recibe relaciones sexuales orales eyacula en la boca de la persona que realiza relaciones sexuales orales; o
  • si la persona que recibe relaciones sexuales orales tiene otra enfermedad de transmisión sexual (ETS).

No tener relaciones sexuales (abstenerse) es la forma más eficaz de evitar el VIH.

Si usted decide tener relaciones sexuales orales y su pareja es un hombre:

  • utilice un condón de látex en el pene; o
  • puede usar condones de plástico (poliuretano), si usted o su pareja son alérgicos al látex.

Estudios han demostrado que los condones de látex son muy eficaces, aunque no perfectos, para prevenir la transmisión por el VIH cuando se usan de manera habitual y correcta. Se pueden usar condones de plástico (poliuretano) tanto de hombre como de mujer, si usted o su pareja son alérgicos al látex. Para obtener más información sobre los condones de látex, consulte la hoja informativa "Los condones y las enfermedades de transmisión sexual".

Si usted decide tener relaciones sexuales orales y su pareja es una mujer:

  • use una barrera de látex (como una pieza de látex de caucho natural, un protector dental o un condón cortado y abierto en forma de cuadrado) entre su boca y la vagina. Una barrera de látex, como un protector dental, reduce el riesgo de que la sangre o las secreciones vaginales entren a su boca. Las envolturas plásticas para alimentos también pueden utilizarse como barreras.

Si usted decide tener relaciones sexuales orales con una pareja masculina o femenina y esto incluye contacto oral con el ano de su pareja (analingus o rimming):

  • use una barrera de látex (como una pieza de látex de caucho natural, un protector dental o un condón cortado y abierto en forma de cuadrado) entre su boca y el ano. Las envolturas plásticas para alimentos también pueden utilizarse como barreras.

Si usted decide compartir juguetes sexuales con su pareja, como consoladores y vibradores:

  • cada uno en la pareja debe utilizar con condón nuevo en el juguete sexual; y
  • asegúrese de lavar los juguetes sexuales después de usarlos.
¿Puedo contraer el VIH teniendo relaciones sexuales anales?

Sí, es posible que cualquiera de los dos compañeros sexuales contraigan el VIH durante las relaciones sexuales anales. El VIH puede encontrarse en la sangre, el semen, el líquido pre-seminal o el líquido vaginal de una persona infectada por el virus. En general, la persona que recibe el semen está en mayor riesgo de contraer el VIH porque el recubrimiento del recto es delgado y puede permitir que el virus se introduzca en el cuerpo durante la relación sexual anal. Sin embargo, una persona que inserta el pene en una pareja infectada también está en peligro porque el VIH puede entrar a través de la uretra (la abertura en la punta del pene) o a través de cortaduras pequeñas, abrasiones o heridas abiertas en el pene.

Teniendo relaciones sexuales anales sin protección (sin usar un condón) es un comportamiento de alto riesgo para la transmisión del VIH. Si usted decide tener relaciones sexuales anales, debe usar un condón de látex. Casi siempre, los condones funcionan bien. Sin embargo, los condones tienen mayor probabilidad de romperse durante las relaciones sexuales anales que durante las relaciones sexuales vaginales. Por lo tanto, aún con un condón, las relaciones sexuales anales pueden ser peligrosas. Una persona debe usar un lubricante basado en agua además del condón para disminuir la posibilidad de romper el condón.

Para más información sobre los condones de látex, visite la hoja informativa "Los condones y las enfermedades de transmisión sexual"


¿Puedo contraer el VIH teniendo relaciones sexuales vaginales?

Sí, es posible contraer el VIH a través de las relaciones sexuales vaginales. En realidad, es la manera más común de transmitir el virus en gran parte del mundo. El VIH puede encontrarse en la sangre, el semen, el líquido pre-seminal o el líquido vaginal de una persona infectada por el virus. El revestimiento de la vagina puede desgarrarse y permitir que el VIH se introduzca en el cuerpo. La absorción directa del VIH a través de las mucosas que revisten la vagina también es una posibilidad.

El hombre está en menos riesgo de infectarse por el VIH que la mujer a través de la relación vaginal. Sin embargo, el VIH puede introducirse en el cuerpo del hombre a través de la uretra (la abertura en la punta del pene) o a través de cortaduras pequeñas o heridas abiertas en el pene.

El riesgo de infección por VIH aumenta si usted o su pareja tiene una enfermedad de transmisión sexual (ETS). Vea también "¿Hay una conexión entre el VIH y otras enfermedades de transmisión sexual?".

Si usted decide tener relaciones vaginales sexuales, use un condón de látex tanto para protegerse usted como su pareja del riesgo del VIH y otras ETS. Los estudios han revelado que los condones de látex son muy eficaces para prevenir la transmisión por el VIH cuando son usados correctamente y sistemáticamente cada vez. Si usted o su pareja son alérgicos al látex, los condones de plástico (poliuretano) para el hombre o la mujer pueden usarse.

Para más información sobre los condones de látex, el condón femenino, y los condones de plástico(poliuretano), vea "Los condones y las enfermedades de transmisión sexual"

¿Hay una conexión entre el VIH y otras enfermedades de transmisión sexual?

Sí. Tener una enfermedad de transmisión sexual (ETS) puede aumentar el riesgo para una persona de contraer el VIH. Esto es igual de cierto para las ETS que causan heridas abiertas o cortadas en la piel (por ejemplo, sífilis, herpes, chancroide) como las que no causan cortadas en la piel (por ejemplo, clamidia, gonorrea).

La infección de ETS puede causar una irritación o herida en la piel, que cause que el VIH se introduza en el cuerpo durante contacto sexual más fácilmente. Aún cuando la ETS no cause ninguna irritación o herida abierta, la infección puede estimular una respuesta inmunitaria en la zona genital que puede causar que la transmisión por el VIH sea más probable.

Además, si una persona infectada por VIH también está infectada por otras ETS, esa persona tiene tres a cinco veces más probabilidad de infectar o transmitir el VIH a otras personas a través de contacto sexual.

No teniendo (absteniéndose de) relaciones sexuales es la manera más eficaz de evitar ETS, incluyendo el VIH. Para esos que estan sexualmente activos, las siguientes actividades para la prevención del VIH son sumamente eficaces:

  • Tener relaciones sexuales que no incluyan las relaciones sexuales vaginal, anal u oral
  • Tener relaciones con sólo una pareja no infectada
  • Usar un condon de látex cada vez que tenga relaciones sexuales

Para más información sobre los condones de látex, el condón femenino, y los condones de plástico(poliuretano), visite la sección en inglés "Los condones y las enfermedades de transmisión sexual"

¿Por qué son las drogas inyectables un riesgo para el VIH?

Al comienzo de cada inyección intravenosa, la sangre se introduce en las agujas o las jeringas. El VIH puede encontrarse en la sangre de una persona infectada por el virus. La reutilización de una aguja o jeringa contaminada de sangre por otro inyector lleva un alto riesgo de transmisión por el VIH porque la sangre infectada puede inyectarse directamente en la torrente sanguínea.

Además, el compartir agujas o jeringas de drogas puede ser un riesgo para la propagación del VIH. La sangre infectada puede introducirse en las soluciones de drogas por los siguientes medios:

  • usando las jeringas contaminadas con sangre para preparar o mezclar las drogas;
  • la reutilización del agua;
  • la reutilización de tapas de botella, de cucharas o de otros envases usados para disolver o calentar las drogas en el agua;
  • la reutilización de los pedazos pequeños de algodón o filtros de cigarrillo usados para filtrar las partículas que podrían bloquear la aguja.

"Los vendedores callejeros" de las jeringas pueden reenvasar las jeringas usadas y venderlas como jeringas estériles. Por este motivo, las personas que siguen inyectando drogas deben obtener jeringas de fuentes fiables, como las farmacias. Es importante saber que compartir una aguja o jeringa para cualquier uso, puede poner a uno en riesgo de contraer el VIH y otras infecciones transmitidas por la sangre.

¿Los profesionales de la salud corren riesgo de adquirir el HIV en el lugar de trabajo?

El riesgo de que los profesionales de la salud estén expuestos al VIH en su lugar de trabajo es muy bajo, especialmente si siguen con cuidado las precauciones universales (por ejemplo, hacer uso de prácticas de protección y usar equipos de protección personal para prevenir la infección por el VIH y otras infecciones transmitidas por la sangre). Es importante recordar que el contacto casual o diario con personas infectadas por el VIH no expone a los trabajadores de la salud o a cualquier otra persona al VIH. En el caso de los profesionales de la salud, el mayor riesgo de transmisión del VIH en el lugar de trabajo ocurre a través de las lesiones accidentales con agujas y otros instrumentos punzantes que pueden estar contaminados con el virus pero, aún así, este riesgo es pequeño. Los científicos calculan que el riesgo de infección por una pinchadura de aguja es de menos del 1 por ciento. Esta cifra se basa en los resultados de varios estudios realizados en profesionales de la salud que se pincharon con agujas contaminadas por el VIH o que estuvieron expuestos por otras vías a sangre contaminada por el VIH.

Para obtener más información sobre cómo prevenir la exposición ocupacional al VIH, consulte la hoja informativa de los CDC titulada “Cómo prevenir la transmisión ocupacional del VIH al personal de cuidado de salud.”

Aunque la estrategia más importante para reducir el riesgo de transmisión ocupacional del VIH es prevenir la exposición, deben ponerse en práctica planes para manejar los casos de profesionales de la salud que ya han estado expuestos al virus. Para obtener directrices sobre el manejo de la exposición ocupacional, consulte el documento en inglés “Updated U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Occupational Exposures to HBV, HCV, and HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis” publicado en el Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report del 29 de junio de 2001.

¿Los pacientes corren riesgo de contraer el VIH en los centros de salud?

Aunque es posible la transmisión del VIH en los centros de salud, este tipo de casos es muy poco común. Los expertos médicos recalcan que la práctica cuidadosa de los procedimientos de control de infecciones, que incluyen las precauciones universales (por ejemplo, hacer uso de prácticas de protección y usar equipos de protección personal para prevenir la infección por el VIH y otras infecciones transmitidas por la sangre), protegen a los pacientes y a los proveedores de atención médica contra el VIH en hospitales, consultorios médicos y dentales.

Para obtener más información sobre cómo prevenir la exposición ocupacional al VIH, consulte la hoja informativa de los CDC titulada “Cómo prevenir la transmisión ocupacional del VIH al personal de cuidado de salud.”

En 1990, los CDC reportaron el incidente de un dentista en Florida infectado por el VIH que aparentemente infectó a algunos de sus pacientes mientras les hacia trabajo dental. Los estudios de las secuencias de la ADN vírica vincularon al dentista a seis de sus pacientes infectados también con el VIH. Los CDC todavía no han podido establecer cómo tuvo lugar la transmisión. Ningún otro estudio ha encontrado evidencia de casos de transmisión del VIH de los proveedores a los pacientes en lugares de atención en salud.

Los CDC han documento casos poco frecuentes en los cuales pacientes han contraído el VIH en un lugar de atención médica por haber recibido tejidos de donantes infectados. La mayoría de estos casos ocurrieron porque no se siguieron las precauciones universales y las recomendaciones para el control de infecciones. Asimismo, la mayor parte de estos casos se presentaron en las épocas iniciales de la infección por el VIH, antes de que hubiera procedimientos oficiales de detección establecidos.

Para obtener más información, consulte la sección “¿Los profesionales de la salud corren riesgo de adquirir el HIV en su lugar de trabajo?” o visite la sección de trabajadores de la salud en el sitio web del National Prevention Information Network (NPIN) de los CDC'

¿Las “lesbianas” u otras mujeres que tienen relaciones sexuales con otras mujeres corren riesgo de contraer el VIH?

La transmisión del VIH de una mujer a otra parece ser muy poco frecuente. Sin embargo, se han reportado casos en los cuales se ha presentado la transmisión del VIH de una mujer a otra. El riesgo bien documentado de transmisión del VIH de mujer a hombre demuestra que las secreciones vaginales y la sangre menstrual pueden contener el virus y que la exposición de la membrana mucosa (oral, vaginal) a estas secreciones tiene el potencial de causar la infección por el VIH.

Para reducir el riesgo de transmisión del VIH, las mujeres que tienen relaciones sexuales con otras mujeres deben hacer lo siguiente:
  • Evitar la exposición de una membrana mucosa, como la boca (especialmente el tejido que no está intacto), a las secreciones vaginales y a la sangre menstrual.
  • Usar condones de manera habitual y correcta cada vez que tengan contacto sexual con hombres o cuando utilicen juguetes sexuales. No compartir los juguetes sexuales. La Administración de Drogas y Alimentos de los Estados Unidos (FDA) no ha determinado la eficacia de los métodos de barrera para las relaciones sexuales orales. Sin embargo, las piezas de látex de caucho natural, los protectores dentales, los condones cortados y abiertos o las envolturas plásticas pueden ofrecer alguna protección contra los líquidos corporales durante las relaciones sexuales orales y posiblemente reducen el riesgo de transmisión del VIH.
  • Entérese si usted y su pareja tienen o no el VIH. Saber esto, puede ayudar a que las mujeres que no están infectadas inicien y mantengan cambios de conducta que reduzcan el riesgo de infección. En el caso de las mujeres que descubren que están infectadas, esto puede ayudarles a recibir tratamiento temprano y a evitar infectar a otras personas.

Para obtener más información, consulte el documento en inglés “HIV/AIDS & U.S. Women Who Have Sex with Women (WSW)”.

¿Puedo contraer el VIH por ponerme un tatuaje o por hacerme agujeros en el cuerpo?

A risk of HIV transmission does exist if instruments contaminated with blood are either not sterilized or disinfected or are used inappropriately between clients. CDC recommends that single-use instruments intended to penetrate the skin be used once, then disposed of.  Reusable instruments or devices that penetrate the skin and/or contact a client's blood should be thoroughly cleaned and sterilized between clients

View the CDC fact sheet on the sterilization of patient-care equipment and HIV (from the CDC Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion Web site).

Personal service workers who do tattooing or body piercing should be educated about how HIV is transmitted and take precautions to prevent transmission of HIV and other blood-borne infections in their settings.

If you are considering getting a tattoo or having your body pierced, ask staff at the establishment what procedures they use to prevent the spread of HIV and other blood-borne infections, such as the hepatitis B virus. You also may call the local health department to find out what sterilization procedures are in place in the local area for these types of establishments.

¿Puedo contraer el VIH mediante una mordida?

Mordida humana:

En 1997, los CDC publicaron los resultados de una investigación realizada por un departamento de salud estatal acerca de un incidente que parecía indicar la transmisión del VIH por contacto con la sangre debido a una mordida humana. En la literatura médica se han presentado otros casos poco comunes en los cuales el VIH parece haber sido transmitido por una mordida. En cada uno de estos incidentes se informó de un trauma severo con desgarre y lesiones extensas de tejido así como la presencia de sangre. La mordida no constituye un mecanismo común de transmisión del VIH. De hecho, existen numerosos reportes de mordidas que no causaron infección por el VIH.

Mordida no humana:

El VIH es un virus que infecta a los seres humanos y por esta razón no puede ser transmitido ni portado por animales. La única excepción son algunos chimpancés de laboratorio que han sido infectados artificialmente con el VIH. Debido a que el VIH no se encuentra en los animales, no es posible que se transmita por una mordida de un animal como un perro o un gato.

Algunos animales son portadores de virus que son similares al VIH, como el virus de inmunodeficiencia felina (VIF) que se encuentra en los gatos o el virus de inmunodeficiencia de los simios (VIS) que se encuentra en los simios. Estos virus sólo pueden existir en su animal portador específico y no son transmisibles a los seres humanos

¿Puedo contraer el VIH por contacto casual (tocando manos, abrazando, usando un inodoro, bebiendo del mismo vaso, o por el estornudo y tos de una persona infectada)?

No. El VIH no se transmite por contacto casual en el trabajo, las escuelas, o los entornos sociales. El VIH no se transmite por el estrecho de manos, los abrazos, o un beso. Usted no puede contraer la infección por un asiento de inodoro, una fuente o bebedero de agua, una perilla de puerta, los platos, los vasos, los alimentos o los animales domésticos.

Un número pequeño de casos de transmisión se ha notificado en donde una persona contrajo el VIH como resultado de contacto con sangre u otras secreciones corporales de una persona infectada por VIH en el hogar. Aunque el contacto con sangre y otras sustancias corporales puede ocurrir en los hogares, la transmisión del VIH es poco común en este entorno. Sin embargo, las personas infectadas por el VIH y las personas que proporcionan asistencia domiciliaria para los que están infectados por el VIH deben estar plenamente educadas sobre las técnicas apropiadas para el control de la infección.

El VIH no es un virus transimitido por vía aérea o transmitido por los alimentos, y no vive por mucho tiempo fuera del cuerpo. El VIH puede encontrarse en la sangre, el semen o el líquido vaginal de una persona infectada. Las tres maneras principales de transmitir el VIH son:

  • mediante las relaciones sexuales (anal, vaginal, u oral) con alguien infectado por el VIH.
  • mediante el compartimiento de agujas y jeringas con alguien que tiene el VIH.
  • a través de la exposición al VIH antes de o durante el nacimiento, o a través de la lactancia materna.

Para más información sobre la transmisión del VIH, vea "El VIH y su transmisión."

Para más información acerca de la provisión de asistencia domiciliaria o el vivir con una persona que está infectada por el VIH, llame al Centro Nacional de Prevención e Información (NPIN) de los CDC .

¿Puedo infectarme con el VIH por la picadura de un mosquito u otro insecto?

No. Desde el principio de la epidemia del VIH han habido inquietudes que el virus del VIH se pueda transmitir por la picadura de un insecto chupa-sangre, como el mosquito. Sin embargo, los estudios realizados por los CDC y en otros sitios no han mostrado ninguna prueba de transmisión por el VIH a través de los mosquitos u otros insectos --- aún en las zonas donde hay muchos casos del SIDA y poblaciones grandes de mosquitos. La falta de tales brotes, a pesar de los esfuerzos intensos para detectarlos, apoya la conclusión de que el VIH no es transmitido por los insectos.

Los resultados de los experimentos y las observaciones de este comportamiento de picadura de insectos indican que cuando un insecto pica a una persona, éste no inyecta su propia sangre o la sangre de la persona a quien pico anteriormente. Más bien, inyecta la saliva, que actúa como un lubricante para que el insecto pueda alimentarse eficientemente. Las enfermedades como la fiebre amarilla y la malaria se transmiten a través de la saliva de especies específicas de los mosquitos. Sin embargo, el VIH vive por sólo un corto tiempo dentro de un insecto y, a diferencia de los microorganismos que se transmiten vía las picaduras de insectos, el VIH no se reproduce (y no sobrevive) en los insectos. Por lo tanto, aunque el virus entre en un mosquito u otro insecto, el insecto no contrae la infección y no puede transmitir el VIH al próximo ser humano que pica.

También no hay ninguna razón para temer que un mosquito u otro insecto podría transmitir el VIH de una persona a otra a través de la sangre infectada que queda alrededor de la boca. Hay varias razones para explicar esto. Primero, las personas infectadas no tienen altos niveles constantes de el VIH en sus corrientes sanguíneas. Segundo, la boca de los insectos sólo retienen cantidades muy pequeñas de sangre en sus superficies. Finalmente, los científicos han determinado que los insectos mordicantes normalmente no viajan de una persona a la próxima inmediatamente después de ingerir sangre. Más bien, vuelan a un lugar donde descansan y digieren esa sangre.
 
¿Debo preocuparme de contraer el VIH por jugar deportes?

No hay ningún caso documentado del VIH siendo transmitido durante la participación en los deportes. El riesgo es muy bajo aún en los deportes que incluyen contacto corporal directo en el cual existe la posibilidad de lastimarse y sangrar.

Si alguien está sangrando, su participación en el deporte debe interrumpirse hasta que la herida pare de sangrar, se limpie con antiseptico y se venda seguramente. No hay ningún riesgo de transmisión del VIH en actividades deportivas en donde no se sangre.



References:

[1] Clinical prevention guidance. Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2006.
[2] UNAIDS. 2004 Report of the Global AIDS Epidemic: 4th global report
[3] Family Health Valentine's Day Tips



Promiscuity